Imminent, Eminent and Immanent

via Dictionary.com

Though these three words may sound exasperatingly similar, they have three very different meanings. When something is imminent, it is destined to happen e.g. “the imminent sunset.” Eminent can refer to a person of high rank or repute: “an eminent king,” or anything that noticeably pokes out like “an eminent nose.” But when something is immanent it is inherent or inborn. Will your immanent linguistic eminence shine through when you use these words correctly? Of course, it’s imminent!

Examples:

A breakthrough in the peace talks is imminent.

The eminent senator was greeted by a standing ovation upon his return.

The protections of liberties is immanent in constitutional arrangements. 

(#31WriteNow day 26)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s